DeLoss Dodds

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The Rumor Mill :: College Football Coaching News and Rumors – Mack Brown Saga

The situation at Texas is nothing short of a soap opera.

Texas head football coach Mack Brown (Photo: AP)Chip Brown at Orangebloods reported Tuesday that Mack Brown would step down as head coach. On Wednesday, he tweeted:

“My sources at the highest level of Texas have re-confirmed my report. I hope we can start talking about Mack Brown’s legacy at Texas soon.”

After the Orangebloods’ report, Mack responded by telling Horns247, “I’m in Florida recruiting. If I had decided to step down I sure wouldn’t be killing myself down here. I have not decided to step down.”

The Dallas Morning News says that the Texas coach and new athletic director Steve Patterson talked for about three hours Sunday and that nothing was decided.

The DMN also reports that Texas President Bill Powers’ infighting with Gov. Rick Perry over education policy and vision has led to a tenuous job status. Powers’ name and employment status are on the agenda for the Texas Board of Regents meeting Thursday.

Multiple sources tell us that Mack Brown’s firewall is Powers. Powers doesn’t like to be pushed around and apparently has no real desire fire Brown. Sources tell us that recruiting is progressing as usual and Texas coaches are still on the road. Brown was spotted at Miami Central High School last night with assistant Larry Porter.

Meanwhile in Tuscaloosa… NFL.com’s Gil Brandt reported that Nick Saban is in contract negotiations with Alabama for a salary around $7 million a year. According to our sources, ‘Bama thought the terms of an extension were pretty well all agreed to, but are now somewhat flummoxed that the situation hasn’t been resolved.

Athletic director Bill Battle was asked about Saban contract extension on Wednesday and replied, “We’re focused on recruiting and playing Oklahoma in the Sugar Bowl.”

Okay. Whatever that means.

Stefan Stevenson, the TCU beat writer for the Fort Worth Star-Telegram, reported that a “source close to Texas executive council of regents says Nick Saban will be next Longhorns coach.”

We don’t have any reason to believe that’s accurate, certainly not at this point.

Our sources tell us they believe Saban will remain at Alabama, but nobody really knows for sure what’s next.

On the Texas front, our sources are split down the middle.

Some believe that the longer Brown staying in place, the better his chances for survival. The Longhorns are scheduled host a recruiting weekend beginning Friday with several JUCO prospects on campus. They feel that there’s no way Brown hosts the weekend unless he’s returning.

Meanwhile, others seem to think Brown is staying in place until and unless Texas has a replacement lined up.

Sources Tuesday morning told us Texas didn’t want to make a move on Brown until the ‘Horns had a replacement in tow. Then, the Chip Brown story broke.

It’s seems pretty clear that Texas has no deal in place with anyone at the moment, and school officials are still trying to figure out how to deal with Brown, who refuses to resign.

In addition, Texas has a president who may not survive past Thursday coupled with a new athletic director who inherited a huge mess and leaks coming from every corner of the university from people with varying agendas.

The latest comes from Mack Brown’s longtime friend and attorney, Joe Jamail.  He spoke with reporters late Wednesday and reiterated Brown has not made a decision as to his future. “He has not tendered his resignation and has not made a decision yet,” Jamail said. “He’ll make that decision sometime soon. “He has not decided yet. He’ll decide that on his own and all these reports are wrong.”

Our best guess as to what ultimately happens? Powers stays and they figure out a way to get Brown out the door with some sort of golden parachute. Jamail’s statement sounds as if this thing is moving toward a conclusion. However, everything could implode as well. Others think Brown won’t back down – no matter what.

Who would replace Brown? We continue to hear that Texas wants Nick Saban, Jim Harbaugh or Jimbo Fisher.

However, we’re told Texas wants a coach in place quickly. If the Longhorns swing and miss on Saban, Harbaugh and Fisher won’t be available until January.

One thing is certain, something has to give.

Photo: AP

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Mack Brown refutes report that he will step down

Texas coach Mack Brown says that an OrangeBloods.com report that he will step down as the Longhorns coach is untrue.

Texas head football coach Mack Brown denies a report that he has decided to step down. (Photo: Michael Thomas, AP)“I haven’t seen (the) article,” Brown told Horns247.com via text message. “I’m in Florida recruiting. If I had decided to step down I sure wouldn’t be killing myself down here.

“I have not decided to step down.”

The Horns247 report indicates that the Texas football staff has not been made aware of any such decision, and that a high-ranking Texas source told the website a decision regarding Brown’s future is expected within the next 48 hours.

On Twitter, CBSSports.com’s Bruce Feldman says that the Orangebloods report “will prove accurate.”

Rumors of Brown’s departure from Texas have been ongoing for the better part of this season.

In addition, Texas’ hiring of Steve Patterson to replace longtime athletic director DeLoss Dodds created more whispers about Brown’s future.

Patterson and Brown had their first sit down meeting in New York City on Dec. 8, and a source told the Dallas Morning News’ Chuck Carlton that the meeting was “positive and productive.”

Later in the week, UT president Bill Powers, a longtime advocate of Brown, became part of the agenda at an upcoming Board of Regents meeting which created “an element of uncertainty” around Brown’s job status, according to Carlton.

Brown is 158-47 record in 16 seasons at Texas, winning 10 bowl games, six Big 12 South titles, three conference titles and the 2005 BCS National Championship.

The Longhorns finished the regular season 8-4, following a 30-10 loss to Baylor on Saturday.

Texas had never failed to win at least nine games prior to the 2010 season, but the Longhorns have not reached the 10-win mark since.

Photo: Michael Thomas, AP

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Reports: Arizona State's Steve Patterson hired as Texas A.D.

Texas has hired Arizona State A.D. Steve Patterson in the same capacity. (Photo: Dominic Valente, The State Press)Arizona State athletic director Steve Patterson will be hired to replace DeLoss Dodds in the same capacity at Texas, according to multiple reports.

West Virginia A.D. Oliver Luck has long been considered the leading candidate for the job with Patterson’s name mentioned as a potential candidate, but the news turned on Tuesday.

Kirk Bohls of the Austin American-Statesman and Sports Illustrated reported Tuesday morning that Patterson — not Luck — was the leading candidate. By midday, both outlets confirmed that the hire was official.

Patterson received his undergraduate degree from Texas and he and Luck both graduated from Texas’ law school.

Dodds announced his intention to retire in September, and will officially step down on August 31, 2014.

Photo: Dominic Valente, The State Press

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Report: Oliver Luck expected to be named Texas AD

We reported last night that Texas’ search to replace DeLoss Dodds as athletics director was focused on Oliver Luck, and if all goes as planned, it looks like Luck’s hiring could be official by the middle of November.

Oliver Luck is expected to be named Texas' AD.OliveOrangebloods.com’s Chip Brown cites multiple sources as indicating that Luck’s name topped a list of potential candidates submitted to a seven-member UT advisory committee by search firm Korn/Ferry International.

According to Brown:

Those sources say Luck is the frontrunner from a group of names put forth by the search firm Korn/Ferry International to the advisory committee last week that also includes Arizona State athletic director Steve Patterson, who got his law degree at Texas.

Luck’s interview with the committee could come as early as this week. If all goes as expected, a contract could be finalized Nov. 13 or 14, when Texas regents are already scheduled to meet.

Nothing is expected to be announced before Texas and West Virginia meet in Morgantown on Nov. 9.

But the Mountaineers have a bye week after their game at Kansas on Nov. 16, so an official announcement could come then.

Luck, the father of former Stanford quarterback Andrew Luck, has strong ties to Texas — both the state and the University. He played quarterback for the Houston Oilers, earned his law degree from the University of Texas, and was general manager of the Houston Dynamo of MLS.

In addition to Luck and Patterson, other names floated as possible replacements for Dodds were Big 12 commissioner Bob Bowlsby, Notre Dame athletic director Jack Swarbrick and Oklahoma AD Joe Castiglione.

Photo credit: Charleston (W.V.) Daily Mail

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Texas AD search focused on one name

Texas’ search for a new A.D. is seems to still focused on one name.

West Virginia AD Oliver Luck (AP Photo)

West Virginia A,D. Oliver Luck

Ever since DeLoss Dodds announced his pending retirement on Sept. 30, the hunt for his replacement has been centered around West Virginia’s Oliver Luck.

According to the Dallas Morning News’ Chuck Carlton, nothing has happened to change that.

West Virginia’s football problems and WVU’s Tier 3 media rights bid snafu this past spring haven’t knocked the shine off Luck’s star. And Texas’ on the field issues haven’t made the job any less impressive to top candidates, either.

UT hired Korn/Ferry International to handle the search, but Carlton hints that KFI won’t have to spend a lot of time vetting candidates. A job like Texas doesn’t exactly require a shotgun approach.

For his part, Luck has been non-committal when asked about the job.

According to Carlton, Texas could move quickly — perhaps within a couple of weeks of the Longhorns’ Nov. 9 date with WVU. If it does, Luck will almost certainly be the choice.

If the search goes on, it may mean the Horns are headed in a different direction.

Photo credit: Associated Press

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Update: Texas, Major Applewhite situation

The Texas Board of Regents recommended no further disciplinary action toward Major Applewhite. (Photo: US Presswire)

The Texas Board of Regents recommended no further disciplinary action toward Major Applewhite. (Photo: US Presswire)

[dropcap]T[/dropcap]he University of Texas Board of Regents held a special meeting Sunday afternoon to discuss Longhorn offensive coordinator Major Applewhite’s “inappropriate, consensual” relationship with a female UT student.

The incident occurred during the 2009 Fiesta Bowl festivities, and Texas athletic director DeLoss Dodds said in a statement that Applewhite admitted to impropriety when the situation came to light and had been disciplined. The female was reportedly a trainer for the Longhorn football team, and Applewhite’s discipline included an 11-month salary freeze.

The Board met for more than two hours via conference call and recommended no further disciplinary action against Applewhite. UT system chancellor Francisco Cigarroa and board chairmain Gene Powell said in a statement (below) that the Board will conduct a review of all policies regarding relationships between UT employees and students, to including disciplinary actions and procedures.

The Applewhite story apparently came to light now – four years later – in the wake of Texas women’s track coach Bev Kearney’s resignation last month. Kearney admitted to having a long-standing intimate relationship with one of her track athletes and surrendered her duties as coach.

According to sources, Texas officials received word that Kearney’s attorney learned about the Applewhite situation and planned to take the story public as part of Kearney’s legal strategy. UT beat them to the punch with the Friday night announcement.

With no further disciplinary action planned, the ball now appears to be in Kearney’s court. Will she move forward with some kind of legal action against the school? If so, will Texas settle the matter or choose to fight what would likely become a very public battle?

Those questions remain to be answered, but as many struggles as the Horns have had both on and off the field of late, the last thing Texas needs is an off-season filled this kind of headlines.

 


Statement from UT System chancellor Francisco Cigarroa and board chairmain Gene Powell:

As leaders of The University of Texas System, our chief concern is and always will be the safety and welfare of the students at our 15 institutions. The No. 1 priority of all UT administrative leaders, faculty, staff and athletic personnel should be protecting our students and ensuring that their experience at any UT institution is a positive and safe one.

Today, we are announcing that Paul Foster, First Vice Chairman of the Board of Regents, will lead a dedicated and focused effort to review and study all policies in place concerning relationships between UT employees and students at all 15 UT institutions. The review will include policies concerning disciplinary actions and procedures as well as compliance with policies for immediate notification of institution administration and the Board of Regents whenever and wherever policies are violated. (Current UT System Rule 178 which went into effect November 1, 2012 covers these policies and requirements, but the rule will be reviewed for possible strengthening.)

We will reach out to national experts to assist in this review and will provide a timeline and announce more details over the next several days.

Our goal is to be both timely and thorough in building a model that can be used nationwide as an example of best practices in dealing with these critically important issues of student protection and student safety.

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Will the Major Applewhite story go away quietly?

Texas offensive coordinator Major Applewhite had an 'inappropriate, consensual' relationship with a student. (Photo: US Presswire)

Major Applewhite had an ‘inappropriate’ relationship with a student. (Photo: US Presswire)

[dropcap]U[/dropcap]niversity of Texas officials have clearly mastered the art of the Friday news dump.

Athletic Director DeLoss Dodds dropped a potential bombshell Friday evening, releasing a statement (below) that Longhorn offensive coordinator Major Applewhite engaged in “inappropriate, consensual behavior with an adult student.”

The statement said it was one-time incident that occurred during the 2009 Fiesta Bowl activities. Dodds said that he learned about the incident shortly after it happened and took immediate action to discipline Applewhite.

“We promptly initiated an inquiry with assistance from the university’s Legal Affairs office and other units outside of Athletics,” Dodds said in the statement. “Major admitted his inappropriate conduct and he was disciplined.”

Applewhite, who played quarterback at Texas from 1998-2001, was hired away from Alabama prior to the 2008 season and was promoted to offensive coordinator in 2011. In a separate statement, Applewhite called the situation “regrettable” and said that he was “upfront and took full responsibility” for his actions.

“This is and was resolved four years ago with the University.” Applewhite said in a separate statement “Through counsel I have worked with my wife and the incident is behind us. I am regretful for my mistake and humbled by this experience. I am deeply sorry for the embarrassment it has caused my friends, family, and the University.”

The story is coming to light now in the wake of another scandal between a Texas coach and a student. Earlier this month, Texas women’s track and field coach Bev Kearney resigned after admitting she had an “intimate consensual relationship” with a student-athlete.

The Texas Board of Regents has called a special meeting for Sunday, Feb. 3 to discuss the Applewhite situation.

The Applewhite and Kearney cases are clearly intertwined, and despite Dodds’ statement that Applewhite has punished appropriately, Austin American-Statesman columnist Cedric Golden believes the situation will not go away. According to Golden:

As part of his punishment, Applewhite had his paycheck frozen for nearly a year. But he kept his job, unlike Kearney who would have probably been fired had she not resigned. Kearney’s attorney Derek A. Howard raised the possibility of legal action in the days following her resignation and told media outlets he would file an open records request, presumably to examine punishments handed to male coaches and professors in similar positions.

Could a lawsuit by Kearney be in the offing? Its looks like a strong possibility.

If that’s the case, this might be one Friday news story that doesn’t go away quietly into the night.

 


Statement from DeLoss Dodds

“Major Applewhite engaged in inappropriate, consensual behavior with an adult student one time during the 2009 Fiesta Bowl activities. After learning of his behavior later that month, I took immediate action to review the situation. We promptly initiated an inquiry with assistance from the university’s Legal Affairs office and other units outside of Athletics. Major admitted his inappropriate conduct and he was disciplined. In determining appropriate discipline, we analyze the facts and circumstances surrounding the behavior and its relation to job responsibilities. Major fully accepted his discipline, including counseling. We have high standards for behavior and expect our staff and coaches to adhere to them in all aspects of their lives. I believe that the appropriate discipline was taken in this case.”

Statement from Major Applewhite

“Several years ago, I made a regretful decision resulting in behavior that was totally inappropriate. It was a one-time occurrence and was a personal matter. Shortly after it occurred, I discussed the situation with DeLoss Dodds. I was upfront and took full responsibility for my actions. This is and was resolved four years ago with the University. Through counsel I have worked with my wife and the incident is behind us. I am regretful for my mistake and humbled by this experience. I am deeply sorry for the embarrassment it has caused my friends, family, and the University. I appreciate all of them. I’ve learned and grown from this and look forward to my work at Texas.”

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